Funeral

Do You Always Say Yes to A Funeral Invite?

When you’re invited to a funeral, is it bad form to immediately suggest that you will be hundreds of miles away on the day to avoid going? Conversely, should you say ‘yes’ to every funeral you are invited to? The answer may depend upon whether you are going to the funeral because you knew the individual or are attending because you want to show support to those left behind. Some people believe you should attend every funeral you are asked to and if this means missing work for a couple of hours or an entire day, then so be it. Is Your Decision Based Upon Age? Are you too young to be attending funerals of elderly relations? Some parents believe that children of all ages should attend a funeral as a mark of respect. Others believe young children and perhaps early teenagers should avoid funerals for as long as possible. Attendance may leave a lasting impression when they are too young to cope with the outpouring of grief and emotion. Others will suggest a funeral is a good life training and education skill. Not all funerals involve someone of your own age or much older. On occasions, it may be a younger person who has died. These are often the most difficult funerals to attend. Do You Need to Consider Your Responsibilities? Is this all about you and how you feel about funerals, as you may not wish to attend, but moral responsibilities remind you that you should? For some individuals, a funeral will be inconvenient to where you needed to be on the day and the appointments you should maybe consider cancelling. For the deceased, they almost certainly couldn’t time their death according to your calendar. Will you even be noticed if you do not attend the funeral, particularly when you were not particularly close to the individual being buried or cremated? Does this help sway your decision about whether to attend or not or are you more worried that you may be seen to miss the funeral and be talked about for years to come? There is, perhaps, no right or wrong answer to the questions posed. Perhaps the final decision may come down to how you feel about the person who has died. You will have to live with your decision, either to attend the funeral, or avoid it. You cannot undo not going to a...

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Base Rate Move Makes Funeral Plans Even More Attractive

After the Bank of England moved the base rate to a low of just 0.25%, banks and other financial operations have moved savers rates downwards yet again. Many bank accounts pay 0.1% or no interest whatsoever. Even ISAs pay from 1.1% to 1.7% if you’ve very lucky to fix a rate and lock yourself in for a period of time. Unfortunately, there is no sign that rates will increase more in the next few years, but it’s a great time to move some of your savings into a pre-paid funeral plan and save money with your savings. Older people have often put money away, to be able to pay for their funeral. They have consistently seen their savings eroded because inflation always appears and often is ahead of the interest rate on savings accounts. This means that your money in a savings account is worth less in real terms, every year. This is not matched by the vast increases in the cost of funerals in the past decade. Embed from Getty Images Inflation rates have eaten into the value of your savings Looking at any period, the figures are similar. Focusing on 1980 to date, funeral costs have risen 6.1% per annum, while inflation has increased by an average of 4.0%. These figures are certainly more than the average savings rate from your bank, building society or other institution. The cost of a funeral is now just over £4,000 for a burial and just under that for a cremation, but figures do vary across the UK. It would appear obvious that moving £4,000 from a savings account into a funeral plan is a great idea. By placing the money into a funeral plan trust account, you know that you will never have to add to that money because funeral plans guarantee to pay your funeral director’s fees at any time in the future. The funeral director is appointed as you prepare your funeral plan and their services are guaranteed to be provided at no extra cost to you, whenever you finally use the plan. Your money is safe and secure You will want to be confident that your money is safe and secure. The Trust funds are published every year so you can see what’s happening with your money in the Fund with tens of thousands of other individuals. The Fund is audited independently by The Funeral Planning Authority...

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What’s on Your Bucket List?

A bucket list doesn’t have to be associated with death, but often is. It is a number of experiences or achievements that a person hopes to have or complete during their lifetime and doesn’t have to be a list drawn up when you know your last days or months are numbered. Ask Jeeves, a website, has put together a list of ’50 British Things To Do Before You Die.’ What would be on your list, given the time, energy, good health and sufficient finances? Many people believe that a bucket list should include visits to see the many wonders of the world, but there are plenty of great places to visit in good old Blighty. Ask Jeeves created the list and it’s based on a survey of British adults about the experiences they thought everyone should enjoy in the UK, so they’re only suggestions. What about visiting the end of Southend’s Pier? It’s the longest pier in the world and you could finish the outing with a Rossi lemon ice cream. Make it part of your funeral plan. From the list, it would appear relatively easy to watch a British player at Wimbledon, these days. THE GREAT BRITISH BUCKET LIST 1. Eat fish and chips on a seaside pier 2. See whales off Wales 3. Go to a night at the proms at the Albert Hall 4. Visit the Giant’s Causeway, N.Ireland 5. Have a picnic at an open air concert 6. Go up in the London Eye 7. Travel Scotland’s West Coast by rail 8. Watch a Shakespeare play in Stratford 9. Dine in a Gordon Ramsay restaurant 10. Go to a British Grand Prix 11. See inside the Houses of Parliament 12. Get the Ffestiniog railway up Snowdon 13. Go to Glastonbury Festival 14. Hold the FA Cup in your hands 15. Take in the view from the top of the Shard 16. Stonehenge on longest day of the year 17. See the trooping of the colour 18. Go to a cricket test match 19. ‘The Prisoner’ village Portmeirion, Wales 20. Have tea at Betty’s tearooms, Harrogate 21. See a traditional Xmas panto 22. Watch a British player at Wimbledon 23. Do a ‘Wainwright’ walk in the Lake District 24. Drive round Brand’s Hatch 25. Visit a whisky distillery 26. Go to a six nations rugby match 27. A Jack the Ripper walk in the East End...

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Funeral Blues (Stop All The Clocks) Poem

This Poem, ‘Funeral Blues,’ often better known by it’s first line, ‘Stop All The Clocks,’ by WH Auden, was famous before it appeared in the film, ‘Four Weddings And A Funeral,’ being read by actor John  Hannah, playing the part of Matthew. Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone, Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone, Silence the pianos and with muffled drum Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come. Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead Scribbling on the sky the message He Is Dead, Put crepe bows round the white necks of the public doves, Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves. He was my North, my South, my East and West, My working week and my Sunday rest, My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song; I thought that love would last for ever: I was wrong. The stars are not wanted now: put out every one; Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun; Pour away the ocean and sweep up the wood. For nothing now can ever come to any good. Wikipedia, says about the writer: Wystan Hugh Auden  21 February 1907 – 29 September 1973), who published as W. H. Auden, was an Anglo-American poet, born in England, later an American citizen, and is regarded by many critics as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. Funeral Blues (Stop all the clocks) is copyright W H Auden, 1937 and if often requested as part of an individual’s funeral...

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Do Not Stand At My Grave And Weep

This is possibly one of the most famous funeral poems. Here it is performed and sung by Katherine Jenkins. ‘Do Not Stand at My Grave and Weep’ is a poem written in 1932 by Mary Elizabeth Frye. Do not stand at my grave and weep, I am not there; I do not sleep. I am a thousand winds that blow, I am the diamond glints on snow, I am the sunlight on ripened grain, I am the gentle autumn rain. When you awaken in the morning’s hush I am the swift uplifting rush Of quiet birds in circled flight. I am the soft stars that shine at night. Do not stand at my grave and cry, I am not there; I did not die. This poem, copyright 1932 by Mary Elizabeth Frye, is often requested, in advance, as individuals prepare their own Pre-Paid Funeral...

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Why Accept A Traditional Coffin?

You don’t have to accept the standard, traditional coffin that your funeral director offers to you. After all, while a coffin does serve an important role as part of the funeral process, with around 75% of people choosing a cremation over a burial across the UK, is the use of the most expensive wood the best use of your money? For the environmentally conscious, choosing a 100% recycled cardboard coffin or making a preference for bamboo and willow coffins at least provides you with a range of choice, whether you have arranged a pre-paid funeral, or not. Print a design onto your coffin An Oxford company, Colourful Coffins  can print for you, on recycled paper, picture coffin designs so that you can choose to be buried or cremated in the national flag of your choice or your favourite football team’s stadium and colours. If you don’t wish to choose one of their hundreds of existing designs you can invent your own and they will print directly on to the coffin of your choice. When you have chosen to use the cremation route, you can select from the same range of designs to complete your ashes casket. You can’t buy direct from the Colourful Coffin Company, but you can liaise with your own funeral director to arrange for your designer send off. While you are arranging a prepaid funeral plan, you can ask your preferred choice of funeral director to order your coffin, complete with your favourite design and all of this can form part of your funeral plan. Related articles How To Go Green With Your...

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