Arrangement

Have You Planned For Your Funeral?

Just one person in nine has confirmed that their funeral wishes are known and understood sufficiently by members of their own family. According to research conducted by Dying Matters, just 70% of people suggest that they are comfortable discussing the subjects surrounding death. Almost as alarming is the fact that just 35% of people have made a will and 11% have confirmed their funeral wishes in writing. When the National Association of Funeral Directors (NAFD) researched their own people, they found that 42% of funeral directors hadn’t even made plans for their own funeral. This doesn’t mean that they haven’t made arrangements in advance, but they have failed to inform those close to them. Writing down your funeral wishes, perhaps by using the leaflet that you can download for free on the Dying Matters website, is a good first step to helping those around you understand more about your funeral wishes. Nevertheless, purchasing a Pre-Paid Funeral Plan is a perfect way to organise all of your arrangements in advance. This will provide peace of mind for those you leave behind because they will not have to worry about wondering what arrangements you would have preferred. Getting your last testament and will written is helpful in stating some of your funeral wishes, but they are only wishes and do not bind anyone to your words. The NAFD research is in line with the British Social Attitudes Survey 2012, which revealed older people are becoming more likely to make their end of life wishes known. If applied to the whole British population, the findings showed that an additional 200,000 people aged 55-75 reported feeling comfortable talking about death compared with 2009, and an extra 400,000 in the same age bracket had discussed their end of life wishes. Related articles ‘Unusual’ funeral requests on...

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What You Must Do After Someone Dies

After someone dies, there can be a lot of confusion about the tasks that need to be completed within a short period of time, such as arranging the funeral, compared to the long-term tasks like dealing with the last will and testament and completing the probate for the deceased’s estate.    A collection of articles from The Money Advice Service takes you through the various stages after someone has died. For those who are unsure what has to happen in the first few days after a death, the first set of articles will prove extremely useful. The second set of information is all about dealing with someone’s estate which includes payment of any debts and taxes that are necessary. The third section deals with how all of the finances will be arranged after one partner dies and the other is left to cope on a different income, but perhaps, after an insurance payout. The fourth set of articles discusses how you can plan ahead after a bereavement when you need to update your will and reconsider your retirement planning. All the information you need online Helpful articles can provide all the information you need at a time which is probably distressing to you and members of your family and friends, after the death of someone close to you. Instead of listening to myths and taking guesses, you’ll find the answers to most of your questions in these helpful articles. One of the best ways to plan how to deal with the funeral after someone dies is to pre-purchase or advance purchase and pay for a funeral plan so that you know the funeral is arranged and paid for, well before the event. This lowers the stress for those left behind. They will also be pleased to have paid at today’s price to protect against future rises of a funeral director’s costs as inflation gradually increases the fees and expenses, year after year. How to do a funeral Related...

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What Does a Funeral Director do, Exactly?

At a time of extreme upset and grief for close family and friends, after a loved one has died, your chosen funeral director will show how they carry the responsibility to make certain that the funeral meets the needs of either the instructions of the person who has died (if they left specific instructions through a Pre-Paid Funeral Plan or perhaps their last will and testament – although family can choose to ignore the latter) or the wishes of the family. They will guarantee to provide a funeral that is extremely fitting and dignified and it will be carried out in an exemplary manner and with a professional behaviour. They are accountable for a funeral being completed while complying 100% with the law. The funeral director will help the family and friends with all of the necessary practicalities from arranging the funeral through to its completion and any necessary actions afterwards. Here is a list of most of the duties you will expect your funeral director to carry out. It’s a fairly general guide and while not completely exhaustive, some funeral directors will be able to offer other services in addition to those listed below. They will arrange for the deceased to be moved from where they died, which may be at home, a hospital, or elsewhere, to the funeral director’s premises so they may prepare the body for the funeral. The funeral director is able to move the body to the family home if that’s your preference. There is a range of documentation that must be completed before a person can be buried or cremated and if you are unsure, the funeral director will help you and offer advice on all of these matters as well as the entire funeral process. Where it is required, the funeral director will prepare the body and a suitable location if people wish to view the deceased before the funeral is completed. In some cases, the funeral director will arrange for the repatriation of the body from overseas so that the deceased can be buried or cremated in the UK. If the funeral is to be held in a different part of the country from where the funeral director operates, they will make all of the arrangements for the transfer of the body. Having inspected the requests of the deceased and discussed those further with close friends and family, the funeral director...

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Can You Hold a Private Funeral?

Whether you’ve organised a pre-paid funeral plan or not, you can arrange a private funeral and service for the people you wish to attend. Who you invite is up to you. By only inviting a select number of people, the event will be quite intimate. The rest of the public and the press won’t be able to join you. The public and the press are, nevertheless, allowed on public roads and other public places around wherever it is that you choose to hold a private funeral and service. One of the most important points about arranging a private funeral is that you don’t have to allow for the expectations of those you don’t wish to attend. You will, however, be denying people the option to attend. This may have been their one opportunity to show their respects and share the occasion with someone they loved or appreciated. By your actions you will undoubtedly cause an element of hurt and offence and if this is with family members you expect to share time with again, the conclusion will be finely balanced and you may need to explain your decisions, very carefully. There is always the option of going with a private funeral and then opting for a public memorial service later. This might suit all of your funeral planning. Whatever your decisions – and they begin from the moment you pre-plan and pre-pay your funeral plan – you won’t be able to undo what you’ve done. If that suits you, then go ahead. If it doesn’t leave you with enough room for movement later, then it’s time to reconsider your...

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