Health

How to Estimate Your Care Home Fee Costs

You may already have heard about the arguments for holding on to substantial savings later on in your life. If you have some money, you’ll be liable to pay towards care home fees. If you have no savings, the fees will all be paid for you, but what is the reality, today? You will want a great sense of security when you are older and in need of a good quality care home. You have to consider both the cost of the accommodation and the actual care, as local authority funding often covers just the nursing and care needs, rather than your accommodation, haircuts and daily newspaper. As it currently stands, if you have assets of less than £23,500, you will qualify for state help with your care home fees.  From April 2016, the rules will change considerably. Under the next set of rules, you may be able to defer your costs. The local authority (and some do this already) may allow you to take out a loan to cover your fees, with the capital and interest repaid on your death, from your estate, whether that’s your home and savings or any makeup of your funds and ownership. The threshold will increase to £118,000 which means that you can hold those funds before paying for care. Second, you will only have to pay lifetime fees of £72,000 towards basic care home costs, but still be liable for your accommodation, haircuts and newspapers. These changes mean that there will no longer become a complete drain on your funds if you hold assets over these levels. There is a limit to how much you are expected to contribute, although those figures are completely unknown and can only be a best guesstimate. Insurance companies will find it easier to understand the level of cover and premiums required to cover your potential care home fees. By planning ahead and having your will written correctly, you can mitigate your potential care home fees, considerably. You should seek advice as soon as possible. Contact us and we’ll direct you to the right people to help you. These individuals will be from outside our organisation, but are trusted by us in presenting the best possible alternatives to our clients. We, of course, will help you set up your pre-paid funeral as part of your overall...

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What to Say When Someone Dies

The website, mindbodygreen, has a great article about what you should never say to someone who is grieving after the loss of a loved one, and manages to balance the writing by sharing what could and maybe should be said. Whenever you’ve not been sure what to say to someone, the article may help you considerably. You do not want to say the wrong thing, which is why some people say very little and others say nothing and avoid the person grieving. Mostly, but not always, people wish to talk when they are grieving as it’s all part of the process. Where you have organised a funeral plan in advance, the grieving process is easier to handle because you can concentrate on the right things and not on how much you wish to spend on flowers and deciding over how many cars you need for the funeral. Related articles Grieve Your Way Your...

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Do Not Stand At My Grave And Weep

This is possibly one of the most famous funeral poems. Here it is performed and sung by Katherine Jenkins. ‘Do Not Stand at My Grave and Weep’ is a poem written in 1932 by Mary Elizabeth Frye. Do not stand at my grave and weep, I am not there; I do not sleep. I am a thousand winds that blow, I am the diamond glints on snow, I am the sunlight on ripened grain, I am the gentle autumn rain. When you awaken in the morning’s hush I am the swift uplifting rush Of quiet birds in circled flight. I am the soft stars that shine at night. Do not stand at my grave and cry, I am not there; I did not die. This poem, copyright 1932 by Mary Elizabeth Frye, is often requested, in advance, as individuals prepare their own Pre-Paid Funeral...

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Who Wants Your Pets After You Die?

Pet lovers around the UK will consistently confirm that the appreciation and treatment of dogs, cats and many other pets is closely equal to that of children and family members. What happens to those pets after the owner dies? When parents die, children will automatically find somewhere else to live. Where the parents leave a last will and testament, they will have named who they expect to be guardians of the children. Guardianship means the management of the children according to the terms of the will and any private detailed information which doesn’t mean that the children have to live with the guardians, although this is normal practice. Where there is no valid will, the children will be placed in a home by the local authority, preferably in the same home area and with family members. Pets, when they become unwanted, are often directed to a pet collection centre and if they are not re-homed in a short period of time, they may be put down. Dogs and cats of a young age are more likely to find a new home, whereas elderly animals face a swift end to their life. There are a number of charities that take in older animals and will keep them alive during their natural lifetime. Would you want someone else’s pet? A recent Probate Practice survey found that 60% of people have not yet written their will with that figure increasing to 89% for the 16 to 29 age group. That’s the age group that will have young children and certainly require a legally valid will to nominate how their children are to be looked after if both parents should die before the children are 18, even if the parents believe their assets are so small that they don’t need a will; they do. The survey suggested that 41% of people would not wish to inherit a pet from a relative. Also, 40% of people did not wish to receive furniture from a will, but 85% of people would accept money. You can insert a clause into a will that leaves an amount of money available to a person or people who will ensure that your pet lives with a quality-of-life that they experienced before you died. Also, you can make arrangements with one of the charities that will look after pets in the event of your death. While your favourite labrador remains...

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The Mail on Sunday Agrees With Us About Living Wills

Today, the Mail on Sunday has printed an article about the reasons why almost everyone should have a Living Will written so that individuals can dictate their wishes when they become incapable of making health decisions – perhaps when you’re in a coma or will be severely brain damaged when you do wake up after an illness or an accident. A Living Will (also known as an Advance Directive) allows you to name a healthcare proxy; someone who will be able to inform doctors about your wishes and gives medical professionals information about when you wouldn’t wish to receive life continuing treatment. Here’s the newspaper link Or you can copy and paste this link:...

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